Beyond the Oath

The stories, advice and random thoughts of a third year osteopathic medical student as he fumbles his way toward becoming a competent physician.

pubhealth:



First Imported Case of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States


CDC confirmed on September 30, 2014, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States in a person who had traveled to Dallas, Texas from West Africa. The patient did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately five days after arriving in the United States.
The person sought medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas after developing symptoms consistent with Ebola. Based on the person’s travel history and symptoms, CDC recommended testing for Ebola. The medical facility isolated the patient and sent specimens for testing at CDC and at a Texas lab participating in CDC’s Laboratory Response Network. CDC and the Texas Health Department reported the laboratory test results to the medical center to inform the patient. Local public health officials have begun identifying close contacts of the person for further daily monitoring for 21 days after exposure.
The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring, as Ebola is only contagious if the person is experiencing active symptoms. The person reported developing symptoms several days after the return flight.
CDC recognizes that even a single case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States raises concerns. Knowing the possibility exists, medical and public health professionals across the country have been preparing to respond. CDC and public health officials in Texas are taking precautions to identify people who have had close personal contact with the ill person and health care professionals have been reminded to use meticulous infection control at all times.
We know how to stop Ebola’s further spread: thorough case finding, isolation of ill people, contacting people exposed to the ill person, and further isolation of contacts if they develop symptoms. The U.S. public health and medical systems have had prior experience with sporadic cases of diseases such as Ebola. In the past decade, the United States had 5 imported cases of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) diseases similar to Ebola (1 Marburg, 4 Lassa). None resulted in any transmission in the United States.
(From CDC)

Reblogged from pubhealth

pubhealth:

First Imported Case of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States

CDC confirmed on September 30, 2014, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States in a person who had traveled to Dallas, Texas from West Africa. The patient did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately five days after arriving in the United States.

The person sought medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas after developing symptoms consistent with Ebola. Based on the person’s travel history and symptoms, CDC recommended testing for Ebola. The medical facility isolated the patient and sent specimens for testing at CDC and at a Texas lab participating in CDC’s Laboratory Response Network. CDC and the Texas Health Department reported the laboratory test results to the medical center to inform the patient. Local public health officials have begun identifying close contacts of the person for further daily monitoring for 21 days after exposure.

The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring, as Ebola is only contagious if the person is experiencing active symptoms. The person reported developing symptoms several days after the return flight.

CDC recognizes that even a single case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States raises concerns. Knowing the possibility exists, medical and public health professionals across the country have been preparing to respond. CDC and public health officials in Texas are taking precautions to identify people who have had close personal contact with the ill person and health care professionals have been reminded to use meticulous infection control at all times.

We know how to stop Ebola’s further spread: thorough case finding, isolation of ill people, contacting people exposed to the ill person, and further isolation of contacts if they develop symptoms. The U.S. public health and medical systems have had prior experience with sporadic cases of diseases such as Ebola. In the past decade, the United States had 5 imported cases of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) diseases similar to Ebola (1 Marburg, 4 Lassa). None resulted in any transmission in the United States.

(From CDC)

liberalisnotadirtyword:

tentacletherapissed:

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

In
Case
Any
Of
You
Have
Doubts
About
This
Fact
(Also the hilarious case of crackers crying about racism due to it)

Remember back when Homeland Security released a report about the potential rise in terrorist activity from right-wing groups, and right-wingers nationwide foamed at the collective mouth in outrage? Seems a nerve was struck.

Reblogged from andimedicine

liberalisnotadirtyword:

tentacletherapissed:

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

In

Case

Any

Of

You

Have

Doubts

About

This

Fact

(Also the hilarious case of crackers crying about racism due to it)

Remember back when Homeland Security released a report about the potential rise in terrorist activity from right-wing groups, and right-wingers nationwide foamed at the collective mouth in outrage? Seems a nerve was struck.

(Source: vintagethriftyprincess)

Oh, and if osteoblrs could also comment on how to balance/juggle COMLEX and USMLE timing and studying

Reblogged from randommomentsdevida

randommomentsdevida:

morebaffledlessbrooklyn:

beyondtheoath:

randommomentsdevida:

And you know, other general study tips!

tumblr_m6fsqkSCGD1rwcc6bo1_250.gif (215×204)

I didn’t take USMLE because I don’t feel the need to balance a ball on my nose like a trained seal for the MDs. If they don’t want me around, so be it. If COMLEX isn’t good enough for them, then two could play at that game.

beyondtheoath
is right. The answer is don’t take both. There’s no reason.

I feel like it depends on what you want to do, residency-wise and other stuff-wise. Also, for some DO students, if they want to practice in their motherland, they have no choice but to obtain an ACGME residency. 

I was recommended to take both by a fourth year because of the timing of the merger, et cetera. Besides, I don’t see a point in limiting my options right away, and there are some residencies, for whatever reason, that are shorter in the ACGME realm than in the AOA realm. 

Those length discrepancies are due to some programs still requiring a Traditional year. And I have had this discussion with a lot of my classmates. Almost verbatim.

If you need ACGME for where you want to live, then you should do it. If you want some rare specialty, then you should do it.

But if you’re like me and just want to be the best physician you can without being someone’s trick pony, then just do COMLEX. Taking two exams is a form of discrimination, especially when the ACGME themselves have stated that COMLEX is an equivalent exam. I feel that if a program director refuses to accept COMLEX, then that isn’t a program I want to be at because they will not allow me to be the osteopathic physician I am trained to be.

coffeemuggermd:

Guys im a problem caffeine consumer.

Coffee Addicts Anonymous

Reblogged from coffeemuggermd

coffeemuggermd:

Guys im a problem caffeine consumer.

Coffee Addicts Anonymous

Oh, and if osteoblrs could also comment on how to balance/juggle COMLEX and USMLE timing and studying

Reblogged from randommomentsdevida

randommomentsdevida:

And you know, other general study tips!

tumblr_m6fsqkSCGD1rwcc6bo1_250.gif (215×204)

I didn’t take USMLE because I don’t feel the need to balance a ball on my nose like a trained seal for the MDs. If they don’t want me around, so be it. If COMLEX isn’t good enough for them, then two could play at that game.

All snark aside: essentially you want to use Pathoma and QBanks. I used UWorld throughout the year as a resource to review material, and then focused on Comquest in the weeks leading up to the Big Day. I also personally used DIT to help me get through that bear that is First Aid.

I did well on my exam. It was about where I expected to be.

carlsagan:

unclepolymer:

Pusheen the cat making some chemistry.

That cat is not wearing safety goggles, he hasn’t even bothered to clean up that spilled solvent, and he is holding that Erlenmeyer flask way too close to his face.
Pusheen the Cat, more like Pusheen the limits of lab safety

Reblogged from --dopamine

carlsagan:

unclepolymer:

Pusheen the cat making some chemistry.

That cat is not wearing safety goggles, he hasn’t even bothered to clean up that spilled solvent, and he is holding that Erlenmeyer flask way too close to his face.

Pusheen the Cat, more like Pusheen the limits of lab safety